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The Fight for Water & Treaty Rights in the Great Lakes

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Enbridge Mainline Abandonment info meeting | MN?>

Monday, October 19, 2015, 1pm | Chucker Auditorium, Davies Hall, Itasca Community College, Grand Rapids, MN 55744

Join Honor the Earth, Winona LaDuke and Itasca College for this informational meeting on the proposal by the Enbridge company to abandon Line 3. The meeting is free and open to the public.

Nationally there are increasing concerns on the liability to local land owners, and county and city governments about abandoned pipelines. Much of the nation’s infrastructure (pipelines, gas mains, roads, water treatment systems) are old, outdated, and crumbling. When this infrastructure is a hazardous materials pipeline with over 900 integrity anomalies (as is the case in Line 3), the local community needs to know the pipeline is not leaving a contamination legacy.”

For more information contact Winona LaDuke, winonaladuke1@gmail.com,

or Teresa Alto, Teresa.Alto@Itascacc.edu

and, www.honorearth.org

 

Enbridge Mainline Abandonment info meeting | MN?>

Tuesday, October 20, 2015, 7pm | American Indian Resource Center, 1500 Birchmont Dr. NE #21, Bemidji, MN 56601

Join Honor the Earth and Bemidji State University for this informational meeting on the proposal by the Enbridge company to abandon Line 3. The meeting is free and open to the public.

Nationally there are increasing concerns on the liability to local land owners, and county and city governments about abandoned pipelines. Much of the nation’s infrastructure (pipelines, gas mains, roads, water treatment systems) are old, outdated, and crumbling. When this infrastructure is a hazardous materials pipeline with over 900 integrity anomalies (as is the case in Line 3), the local community needs to know the pipeline is not leaving a contamination legacy.”

For more information contact Winona LaDuke, winonaladuke1@gmail.com,

or Jordan Morgan, Jordan.Morgan@live.bemidjistate.edu

and, www.honorearth.org

 

Enbridge Mainline Abandonment info meeting | WI?>

Wednesday, October 21, 2015, 11am | The Great Room , Yellowjacket’s Union Hall, University of Wisconsin, 1605 Catlin Ave., Superior, WI 54880

Join Honor the Earth, Debra Topping and Korey Northrup for this informational meeting on the proposal by the Enbridge company to abandon Line 3. The meeting is free and open to the public.

Nationally there are increasing concerns on the liability to local land owners, and county and city governments about abandoned pipelines. Much of the nation’s infrastructure (pipelines, gas mains, roads, water treatment systems) are old, outdated, and crumbling. When this infrastructure is a hazardous materials pipeline with over 900 integrity anomalies (as is the case in Line 3), the local community needs to know the pipeline is not leaving a contamination legacy.”

For more information contact Winona LaDuke, winonaladuke1@gmail.com,

or Debra Topping & Korey Northrup, 218.721.2748, or 906.235.9865

and, www.honorearth.org

 

Support The Bad River – Write to the EPA?>

Led by The Bad River Band of Lake Superior Chippewa, six bands of the Anishinaabeg Territory have sent a letter to the EPA asking them to undertake a 404c process, which would allow them to pre-emptively stop the open pit taconite mine proposed for the Penokee Hills of Wisconsin because of the importance of the resources that it threatens. Letters of support are needed from the public. The letters will be hand delivered to the EPA when the tribes meet with Region 5 Director, Dr. Susan Hedman.

You can find  a sample letter here.

Please send your letters to Bad River by Friday, August 15, 2014.

You can e-mail your letter to CommDir@badriver-nsn.gov

Or, mail a hard copy to

Mark Anthony Rolo, Bad River Legal Department, PO Box 39, Odanah, Wi 54861

For more information visit, www.protectpenokeehills.org/

American Indian Sovereignty & Resource Management | WI?>

April 7-8, 2014 | University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53201

The Department of American Indian Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee will host this two day conference on American Indian Sovereignty and Resource Management.

Speakers |

Bad River Tribal speakers include Michael Wiggins, Jr., Bad River Tribal Chairman, Edith Leoso, Tribal Historic Preservation Officer, Aurora Conley, Vice-Chairperson-Anishinabe Environmental Protection Alliance, Jill Hartlev, Adolescent Life-Skills Coordinator, Jo Rose Sr., Tribal Elder, Mary Lou Salawater, Tribal Elder

Sokaogon Chippewa Tribal speakers include Fred Ackley, Tribal Elder, Frances Van Zile, Tribal Elder, Robert Van Zile, Ojibwe instructor, Indian Community School, Tina Van Zile, Environmental Director at Sokaogon Chippewa Community

The Conference is free and open to the public. No registration is required.

For more information and a complete schedule visit the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee website.

Or contact, carym@uwm.edu

Stop the Mine! Bad River Panel Discussion | MN?>

Friday, March 14, 2014, 6-8pm (CT) | William Mitchell College of Law, Auditorium, St. Paul, MN 55105

Gogebic Taconite is proposing the world’s largest open-pit taconite mine just upstream from the Bad River reservation. This area holds some of the most beautiful and unique landscapes in the Upper Midwest, yet the Wisconsin legislature has changed the state’s mining laws to accommodate the project.

Join attorneys and representatives from the Bad River Band of Lake Superior Chippewa to learn more about the proposed mine, how the Band plans to respond, and what you can do to help protect your Great Lakes and her people.

For more information visit the event Facebook page at, www.facebook.com/events/1379162269024279/

Treaty Rights & Mining: An Overview | WI?>

Wednesday, March 12, 2014, 7pm | Sigurd Olson Environmental Institute, Sentry Rm, Northland College, 1411 Ellis Ave., Ashland, WI

Speaker: Ann McCammon-Soltis, Great Lakes Indian Fish & Wildlife Commission

Eleven federally-recognized Ojibwe tribes in Wisconsin, Michigan and Minnesota have reserved hunting, fishing and gathering rights in territories ceded to the United States through treaties. No state may take away tribal treaty rights, nor allow the destruction of treaty-protected resources such as land or water. So, how are treaty rights affected by human activities such as mining?

Ann McCammon-Soltis, director of the Division of Intergovernmental Affairs at the Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission Director will provide an overview of Treaty Rights and Mining.

This presentation is part of the institutes 2014 Perspectives on Mining Series. The Sigurd Olson Environmental Institute works with Northland College and regional partners to promote stewardship, identify opportunities, deliver educational programs, and facilitate solutions that address environmental issues throughout the North Country.

For more information visit the institute’s website, www.northland.edu/sigurd-olson-environmental-institute-overview.htm

More Video Artists = More Information?>

We’re adding a new feature to the Trust website. Our Watch Video page will now include videos by allied artists. Our goal for Trust is to spread information related to hard-rock mining, treaty rights and the protection of the Great Lakes across cultures, across the region and across the country. This new collection of videos by filmmakers from the region will help us do just that. These videos will explore cultural, scientific and legal information related to these topics. We hope you enjoy them and share them. Just click here.

More than Dusty Historical Documents: Treaty Rights in the Penokee Hills?>

An excerpt from an excellent article by Ron Seely on treaty rights and the proposed GTAC project. Read the full article here.

THE PENOKEE RANGE – The fight over the fate of a massive iron ore mine has moved this summer from the state Capitol in Madison to the forests of northwestern Wisconsin and the green, undulating ridges along which Gogebic Taconite wants to dig its 4½-mile-long pit.

National and state news coverage of the mine has focused on a traditional Ojibwe encampment deep in the woods, about 30 miles southeast of Ashland, at the very edge of the proposed pit. From the rustic camp, started by members of the Lac Courte Oreilles Chippewa band, tribal members have launched what seems a cultural offensive – think fry bread, wild onions and birch bark baskets – to turn public opinion against the mine.

But organizers of the camp say it has an even deeper purpose.

Tribal officials and a treaty law expert say the Iron County camp, dubbed a harvest camp by Ojibwe, or Chippewa, lays the foundation for a possible legal case in which the tribe would invoke federal treaties.

Their goal: Block construction of the mine.

…”the harvest camp is helping make real the practices the treaties protect, including collecting food and natural medicines, from wild onions to mushrooms to maple syrup and tamarack bark,” said Glenn Stoddard, a lawyer who represents the Bad River Band of Lake Superior Chippewa.

Organizers of the camp also are inviting non-tribal members to visit so they can show them the wild Penokee landscape and the proposed mine site.

“Many people aren’t even aware of the treaties,” Stoddard said. “They haven’t been educated about them. Also, society has become much more urban so the activities covered by the treaties are foreign to people.

“The camp is intended to educate people about these things. It is one thing to be in a courtroom talking about the treaties. It is another to be out in the woods and see people exercising their rights. Then it makes sense to people.”

Read the full article here. http://www.wisconsinwatch.org/2013/07/28/in-penokees-camp-tribes-flex-treaty-muscles-to-block-mine/

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